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News/Blog: Tenant Connection Newsletter #17

Hope In The New Year: Stay Safe Now With BC Covid-19 Health Guidelines

2020 was the year that challenged most of us in unprecedented ways. As we begin 2021, there are many reasons for hope, including Canada’s vaccine rollout. We still have a ways to go before we can resume many of the things we miss and love, but there is light at the end of the tunnel. Hopefully that makes it easier, as cases have risen across BC following the holidays, for many of us to uphold the current safety practices. Here, we include some of them to ensure all of our tenants have up-to-date information.

For more details, visit:

https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/safety/emergency-preparedness-response-recovery/covid-19-provincial-support/

Social gatherings

Currently, no social gatherings, of any size, at your residence with anyone other than your household or core bubble. This means that for the time being, please do not invite friends or extended family to your home, no hosting of outdoor gatherings, and no playdates for children.

Allowed Activities

These activities are not considered a social gathering, so enjoy them!

◦ Going for a walk (although BC guidelines caution to make sure a walk does not turn into an outdoor gathering)

◦ Parents carpooling kids to and from school

◦ Grandparents providing child care

◦ Some public pools, most playgrounds, and skating rinks are currently open!

Core bubble

For most people, their core bubble is their immediate household. For others, including people who live alone, their core bubble may also contain a partner, relative, friend or co-parent who lives in a different household. This should be a maximum of two people outside of those living in your immediate household.

Co-parenting and supporting isolated family members

For those who parent from separate households or rely on a family member or close friends for support with things like picking up children after school or delivering essential items like mail, medication or groceries, these activities can continue.

People who live alone

For people who live alone, a core bubble is a maximum of two people you see regularly.

Keep Your Body Healthy With These Indoor Movement Class Options

Access classes anytime in Chair Yoga and Feldenkrais, a technique which uses gentle, mindful movement to heal chronic pain! These classes are free and available to anyone at www.facebook.com/svhousing under the ‘Live’ tab.

Choose To Move: A Program for Adults 65+

Choose To Move is a free program offered across BC. Based on research, it provides older adults with the motivation and support to become more active. Choose To Move can help participants integrate activity into their daily routine in a flexible way, meet new friends, and make a positive change. Participants receive both individual and group support to develop and stick to a personal activity plan that includes activities they enjoy and are able to do. Choose To Move is great for anyone age 65 and older that wants to become active. You can learn more at www.choosetomove.ca.

BC Recovery Benefit: You Can Still Apply

Haven’t applied yet? Learn more about your eligibility for this one-time, tax-free benefit of up to $1000 for families, and $500 for individuals. Amount is determined by income. For more details, and to apply, visit https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/economic-recovery/recovery-benefit

Want to Play Bingo?

Contact our office! Call 250.384.3434 x 22 or email info@greatervichousing.org

Holidays Around The World: Lunar New Year

Lanterns celebrating Lunar New Year

The Lunar New Year, most commonly associated with Chinese New Year or Spring Festival, is celebrated in several Asian countries in addition to China, including South Korea, Singapore, Vietnam, and Tibet. It typically falls sometime between January 21st and February 20th each year. In 2021, the Lunar New Year will be on February 12th. In China, the 16-day celebration kicks off on Lunar New Year’s Eve with a family feast, and culminates with the Lantern Festival on February 26th. It is considered a time of new beginnings and family gathering, with the overarching themes of fortune, happiness, and health. Celebrations include the Dragon Dance and Lion Dance, where skilled gymnastics and puppeteering are on display. Families set off firecrackers and fireworks, and older family members gift red money-filled envelopes to younger people. It’s also considered lucky to dress in red. Traditional foods include dumplings, sweet rice balls, whole fish, spring rolls, and tangerines. The Chinese Zodiac, a repeating cycle of 12 years with each represented by an animal, turns on Lunar New Year: 2021 is the Year of the Ox!

GVHS Newsletter Issue 17